WRITING / Reference Verbs

 Reporting verbs

Popular academic reporting verbs

advances

argues

asserts

assumes

casts doubt on

claims

comments

contends

declares

demonstrates

describes

emphasises

explains

highlights

hypothesises

implies

maintains

mentions

notes

observes

questions

pinpoints

points out

proposes

provides evidence

puts forward

shows

states

stresses

suggests

Sentence examples of academic verbs

In a latest article Morton (2012) explains how information technology is changing society.

Schmidt (2010) describes the process of language acquisition.

Kon (2000) suggests that all poets are strongly influenced by their childhood (says indirectly or tentatively)

Lee(2006)  states that problems arose earlier than previously thought. (says directly)

Uvarov (2001) claims / asserts / contends / maintains / declares that the causes of the revolution can be traced back to the 18th century ( says something is true directly, and firmly, often used when others disagree)

Van et al (2002) implies  that other historians have been misinterpreted the period. (suggests indirectly)

Patel (1987) argues that governments should continue to fund space projects (he gives reasons for his view)

Greenberg (2001) emphasises / highlights / stresses the importance of taking a liberal approach (gives particular importance to)

Levack (2010) observes / notes / comments / points out that there are contadictions in Day’s interpretation of the poem (states but does not develop at length)

Kim (2005)demonstrates / shows how Bach’s music draws considerably on earlier composer’s work.

Gray (2012) proves there is a link between obesity and genes (shows that something must be true)

In the book Dean (2010) mentions some new research in the field (refers to briefly)

McIntosh (2012) pinpoints the key features of the period in question (focuses in on it)

Vaz (1998) advances / puts forward / proposes a new theory (used with idea, theory, hypothesis)

Davidson (2006) casts doubt on previous research in the field (suggests it is inaccurate)

Gerrand (2001) questions previous interpretations of the play (suggests it is inaccurate)

 

Source: Mccarthy, M & O’dell, F (2007) Academic English in Use, Cambridge

Teacher’s Activity for reporting verbs

Reporting verbs: the above teacher’s activity 

  Cut up and match class activity. Give out the information sheet – students read down through the different verbs and uses. Then give out the activity for students to match verb to definition. Level ***** [B1/B2/C1] 

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Reporting Verbs Worksheet

free download – put these verbs into the correct sentence.

Reporting verbs: worksheet 

 Use the verbs in the box to put into the sentences in the worksheet. Each sentence has a description of the type of verb needed. Check the grammar of the verb too!

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    Writing a paragraph – using quotes about smoking

Students are given a worksheet with nine quotes taken from The New Scientist, BBC News, The Economist, etc… and choose only three. They use these three quotes to write a paragraph trying to paraphrase the quotes and produce a cohesion piece of writing. Level ***** [B1/B2/C1]   Example  / Webpage link /  TEACHER MEMBERSHIP

 ://academic-englishuk.com/wp-admin/post.php?post=122& 

 

Paraphrasing Lesson – how to paraphrase effectively!

 It starts by discussing the differences between quotation, paraphrase and summary. It takes students through the basics of identifying key words, finding synonyms and then changing the grammatical structure. There is plenty of practice all with efficient teacher notes. Level ***** [B1/B2/C1]   Example / Webpage link / TEACHER MEMBERSHIP

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